Womens Fitness Centers

The local YMCA is a great place to get a workout if you’re a guy. However, most ladies like to work out among other ladies rather than in mixed company. Womens fitness centers recognize our desire for privacy and many of them are popping up in communities far and wide. Finding women’s fitness centers in your area has never been easier.
One of the hottest workout places for ladies to frequent is Curves. This women’s fitness center caters to the average lady. Not only does this place recognize that we all come in different shapes and sizes. It also recognizes that we come in different abilities as well. These womens fitness centers are perfect for anyone who wants to work at her own pace.
The great thing about these facilities is the attention to the individual. You get to work with a trainer who helps you design a great workout and a great eating plan, too. The combination of diet and exercise is created to get you into shape or keep you in great shape depending on your specific needs.
These womens fitness centers are perfect for anyone who has little time to spend at the gym. Each session is only 30 minutes long so you can be in and out in relatively little time. You can also engage in non-sweat workouts during some busier days that don’t allow you enough time for a shower.
There is no excuse for skipping your workout with these women’s fitness centers in your region. Many of these organizations offer transfers as well. You can sign up at one of the womens fitness centers but move your membership to another if you need to do so. You can also visit any of the Curves centers and work out if you are in the area.
I was thrilled to find that these womens fitness centers were all over the place. My husband and I took a little vacation that was relatively close to home. I was able to visit one of the women’s fitness centers while we were away. This was a great surprise to me and I was thrilled that I didn’t have to skip my routine during the brief getaway.
Similar facilities may be in your area. You don’t have to work out with the guys in the gym. You can find womens fitness centers if you really look. I assure you that you will stick to your workout better if you are comfortable in your gym.

Women’s Health Advice: Five Powerful Anti-aging Tips

Years ago, the word “anti aging” seemed to come only from science fiction movies. People joked about the Fountain of Youth and miracle medicines that were supposed to reverse the aging process to make one look 10 or 20 years younger. But today, anti-aging is more than a myth. Through scientific studies and the new
cutting edge science in genomics, women are discovering that, by taking just a few steps, skin beauty and bodily cell health can indeed be encouraged. Here are five powerful anti aging tips for good women’s health.
1. Check Your Lifestyle
A lifestyle filled with health-threatening habits can be detrimental to your skin’s health and beauty. Smoking, drinking alcoholic beverages in excess, eating poorly or overeating, sunbathing, etc. all can speed up the aging process. Even taking anti-aging supplements may not help if you continue to do these things regularly. Remember, just as your bodily organs are affected by everything you eat or drink, so are your skin cells.
2. Eat for Good Skin Health
Good women’s health starts with eating healthy foods. Be sure to eat balanced meals with an abundance of leafy green vegetables and fruits. Eat protein-rich foods such as nuts or eggs to maintain good bone and joint health. Healthy eating and weight loss are both major contributors to good women’s health as well as beauty for the skin. The anti-aging process is much easier when you provide your body with the nutrients and vitamins it needs to repair cell damage and build healthy new cells on a daily basis.
3. Drink Water
The diet programs always cry aloud, “Drink water!” That’s because there are so many benefits to drinking water. Water is needed to help the body function properly, inside and out. Water brings life to all your body parts – and your skin as well. It brightens your complexion, helps rejuvenate skin cells to promote anti aging, and adds moisture to your body. You’ll be a well-oiled machine if you can commit to drinking plenty of water daily. Water is probably the most readily available anti-aging product you can get your hands on! So, replace those sodas (and diet sodas) with a healthy dose of water.
4. Stay in Shape
Staying in shape with exercise will also help with the anti-aging battle. Exercise encourages good bone and joint health and helps with the flow of blood through your body. That’s why many people say that exercise “gets your blood pumping!” The blood carries oxygen with it through your body, which is necessary for good overall health.
5. Use Anti-aging Supplements and Creams
Through the cutting edge science of genomics, anti-aging products are now being developed to aid in cell rejuvenation, which is needed for slowing down the aging process.
Genomics is the study of the complete DNA makeup of organisms. The recent discovery that is crucial to those interested in anti-aging products is that the repair of cells and the creation of healthy, strong cells is a major key to slowing the aging process. The new anti-aging products are all-natural and come in pills, creams or patches. Anti-aging products based on genomics help to provide the right amount of ingredients (vitamins and nutrients) needed by the body to repair cells and build new, healthy cells.
These five tips combined can help maximize the results for your anti-aging efforts. You’ll feel and look better than ever as you pass through the stages of life.

Women's Sexual Health: Age Doesn't Matter

Most women fear that as they age and the hormone levels drop, so too will their enjoyment of, and oftentimes desire for sex.
Fortunately, while diminishing hormones and sex may happen in the same breath, the latest research indicates that sexual desire has less to do with these changes than it does with lifestyle and other women’s
sexual health factors, at least some of which are under a woman’s direct control.
According to reports from a group of distinguished European sex experts in the first ever supplement to The Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society, the findings have helped healthcare professionals discard the notion that sexual difficulties occurring close to menopause are either biologic or physiologic.
The new research was part of a series of studies conducted on female sexual dysfunction by the department of clinical psychiatry and psychotherapy at Hanover Medical School in Hanover, Germany. As part of the overall project, 102 women aged 20 to “45 plus” answered 165 questions designed to flush out determinants of female sexual satisfaction.
Specifically, researchers hoped to determine satisfaction with sex life in general, sexual satisfaction and orgasm during intercourse, petting, masturbation, attitudes towards sexuality, quality of partnership, and women’s sexual health myths.
Based on the study, there appeared to be no differences with respect to frequency of sexual intercourse or the desire for sexual activity not involving intercourse among the differing age groups. Age did not make a difference in regard to frequency of orgasm or in sexual satisfaction ratings with their partners. For example, 29% of women up to age 45 reported having orgasms “very often,” compared with 26% of women over age 45.
Even more dramatic was that while 41% of women over age 45 reported having orgasms “often,” only 29% of younger women reported having orgasm “often.”
Among the few differences in the groups: Women over 45 reported having fewer orgasms during non-intercourse sexual activity or during masturbation. Both groups of women reported a dual dimension necessary for successful lovemaking that included having both feelings of emotional closeness to their partner and satisfactory physical experiences.
After comparing all the answers from both older and younger women, as well as from women who reported sexual problems and those who did not, researchers concluded that the single most influential factor with regard to women’s sexual health satisfaction via intercourse was the quality of the partnership, in particular the quality of mutual respect, which then becomes of greater importance as a woman ages.
After comparing these study results to earlier and ongoing findings, the researchers concluded that the basis of any sexual problems that did occur at midlife could not be drawn from menopause status or age alone. Instead, life stressors, contextual factors, past sexuality, and mental health problems are more significant predictors of midlife on women’s sexual health interest than menopause status itself.
This study was just one of several research papers presented in the journal on the subject of women’s sexual health dysfunction. Each one striving to shed much needed light on a subject that some believe has been hidden in the shadows too long.

Women’s Health Blogs – Adventures In The Blogsphere

Writing, as a form of therapy, is as old as ink itself. Universally understood as a transformative process, the simple act of putting pen to page can effectively jump start personal growth and healing.
Over the years I’ve had more than a handful of sessions on a therapist’s couch sorting through the baggage
I’ve built, bought, borrowed and inherited in my 48 years. Without exception, each qualified practitioner proposed the following recommendation: start and keep a daily journal.
Seems much angst and worry can be worked through with pen and paper. Yet for reasons that can only be explained as part of ‘my personal charm,’ my journal keeping would start and lapse in record time. Nevertheless, I knew the writing process to be powerful despite my inability to be consistent. Once, after managing to hold my journaling nose to the grindstone for 13 weeks, I leapt tall buildings made of artist block and landed on the other side, with renewed energy and fabulous paid work.
And yet, despite my success, I quickly discontinued putting my thoughts on paper.
Miraculously, last spring, my lifelong writing inertia evaporated with the click of a computer button. As easy as one, two, three, I started my own on-line journal, more commonly known as a blog.
A blog is a web log comprised of a series of posts, about the author’s choice of subject, from professional to personal. Every entry is date and time stamped as they are published, giving the material the feel of a traditional diary.
Blog procedure is exceedingly simple and free for anyone with access to a computer. I type my thoughts, press the publish toggle and instantly my rants and raves go live on the World Wide Web. There is no middle person, web mistress, publisher or editor to be found. Blog control post, pace and frequency is in the blogger’s hands.
However, there is one distinct motivating difference between your traditional hard copy diary hidden away, under the bed, and your blog. Blogging offers a possible audience.
My first thought was to use a blog to share the unusual adventure of my Calendar Girl life and draw attention to the Breast of Canada project. It took no time to realize that a following of fans was a big buzz, injecting tremendous energy into the somewhat relentless process of making, marketing and moving 3000 calendars every year.
My second blog took on a digest format offering alternative breast related news that was a simple by-product of my role of publisher.
Blog number three was born thanks to a peri-menopausal fit of memory and hair loss. Fondly called ‘My Menopause Blog, How to Punctuate Life Without a Period,’ This effort truly fits the therapeutic writing model and contributes enormously to my state of mind.
Writing publicly about my petulant period, in real time, is like inviting a bunch of menopausal women over for tea and a heart-to-heart. Not surprising, scaling the dome of silence surrounding menopause, and talking above a whisper about ‘The Pause’ resonates deeply with women readers.
Shooting from the hip and funny bone, I share my findings of remedies, attitude shifts and my belief that menopause is not a disease. Thinking broadens with each entry; confidence grows as does understanding and a liberated sense of ageing. My Menopause Blog is like a cyber red tent for anyone interested in musing on maturity.
Eventually, curiosity lead to an on-line exploration of blog networks, blog rolls and search engines to see if other women were writing about their lives, health and well being.
Turns out, they are. Thousands of blogs are written by new moms, freshly divorced, empty nesters, the menopausal, survivors of cancer, stay at home parents, clinically depressed and chronically curious. Photos are up-loaded. Advice is sought. Human contact is collected by way of comments that reader’s leave like cyber hugs. There’s a whole lot of contact being made between people separated by geography, but connected by circumstance.
Clever blog names are common with blog owners. Ellie at This is My Body, This is My Blood offers a hilarious window into her peri-menopausal pity party. ‘I’m Out of Estrogen and It’s Not Pretty’ provides a window into Victoria’s menopausal life. A group blog that I randomly come across claims: “Running this blog is about 50,000 times cheaper than a good therapist.”
This new cyber kid on the block follows a blogger code of conduct that creates a safe, encouraging and friendly zone where you can let yourself hang out, be human and be heard. Not everyone writes like a professional, although there are excellent pro bloggers leading many a parade of readers. Countless circles of similarly focused, differently skilled people gather in and share the Blogosphere.
My greatest blogging benefit comes from my daily commitment to write just like the psychologists suggested. I clear my head, sort out my hormone-scattered feelings, get cheered on and remind myself that life is dynamic. Indeed, the cyber trail documentation of my menopausal mood swings is time stamped proof.

Women's Health and Weight Loss Tip #3: The Importance of Iron in a Woman's Diet

One of the biggest weaknesses of the traditional commercial <b>diet</B> is the lack of <b>iron</b> that exists in its stringent and often excessively limited eating guidelines. In order to lose weight, many unsuspecting women get bamboozled into taking part in weight loss programs that cut out many of the
nutrients that they need. Iron is one of the primary
casualties of such diets and weight loss plans.
The plot thickens for women in particular due to the fact that their bodies regularly lose iron during menstruation.  Therefore, eating a low-calorie, low-iron diet in an effort to lose weight only makes the problem more severe.
It is generally suggested that women supplement their diets with an iron supplement such as the Vitality multivitamin offered by <i>Melaleuca, the Wellness Company</i>. This is particularly important during periods of heavy exercise and training that are typical aspects of any weight loss program or general effort to lose weight even when a special program is not in use.
One thing to be on guard for, however, is excessive iron supplementation by iron-deficient (non-<b>anemic</b>) women.   There is a disorder known as <b>hemosiderosis</b> which results from large deposits of iron made in the liver that causes a glitch in the proper metabolism of the iron itself. Avoiding prolonged large doses will eliminate the risk of this particular disorder.
Below are a few recommendations from the American Council on Exercise (ACE) that will help you to make sure you get the adequate amount of iron intake in your daily diet, whether on a program to lose weight or not:
<ul>
<li>Eat foods with a high vitamin C content with all meals. Vitamin C aids in the absorption of iron. (examples: salsa; chili peppers; oranges)
<li>Include dark meat chick and/or turkey in the training diet. Both of these are rich in iron
<li>Vegetable proteins such as split pea soup or chili beans with lean meat help the iron in those meats to properly absorb
<li>When eating starchy carbohydrates such as cereals, breads, and pastas, gravitate to those labeled “enriched” or “fortified” for their higher iron content.</li>